Installing Peel and Stick Vinyl Tile (for Realists)

That’s right, I’m still milking our kitchen makeover for every last blog post I can squeeze out of it! Today I’m ruminating on vinyl tile installation, and its pros and cons. To get up to speed on what we’ve done since we moved in, check out this post. Here’s a quick and dirty comparison of the old and the new floors:

floors before and after

Installing peel and stick tile sounds really easy to do, and looks really easy on home reno shows. I mean, it only has two steps: 1) Rip up old floors and 2) stick on tiles! Well friends, I’m here to burst your bubble and will not sugar coat this for you.

We went with peel and stick tile because we thought that it would be a quicker and cheaper option than ceramic tiles. One of our future plans is to do a complete kitchen reno, and we didn’t want to spend a lot of time and money on ceramic tile only to rip it up once we change the layout of the kitchen. I naively thought that using vinyl tile meant this could be done in a day, or a weekend tops; this turned out to be a huge underestimation. Between all of the steps involved (yes, I was lying when I said this only had two steps), we spent a week on this. We weren’t super efficient about it, but still, it took a lot more time than I was expecting. As my husband put it, using peel and stick makes the easiest part of installing tiles- the placement of the tiles- even easier; you still have to do almost the same amount of prep work before you can apply the tile. But getting to a level, smooth, clean surface takes a lot of time. So buckle up and let me take you through what this project actually involves!

Step 1A): Remove Old Flooring

If the original floors had come up easily then this would have taken a lot less time and I would be less bitter about it, but the linoleum was an absolute nightmare to remove. At first we could only get it off in 1 inch or so chunks that chipped off when we tried to peel it, leaving a paper and adhesive layer behind. I had a friend helping me with this step (Thanks MT!!) and after about an hour of making almost no progress, she suggested we look online for help. We found a few YouTube videos that recommended using a heat source to soften the glue first, which ended up being a lifesaver. We found the best method was using a heat gun to first soften the glue and a flat edge trowel to lift up the flooring- this left the least amount of paper/adhesive behind. Other variations we tried were an iron and a metal cake lifter, and a hair dryer and a putty knife. During this step, we wore half face masks with P100 cartridges for vapours and particulates- we had no idea what was under the floors and heating the linoleum gave off a pretty nasty plastic smell. We also kept all the windows open for ventilation, so this is not a Canadian winter friendly project.

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Using a heat gun and putty knife to lift the old linoleum

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I gave this step got a major thumbs down

Step 1B): Patch Uneven Areas & Repair Damaged Subfloor

Once the old flooring was up and the remaining adhesive and paper had been scraped off, we patched the surface with a product that Home Depot recommended, SimplePrep Pre-Mixed Floor Patch. My husband did this step and he didn’t like this product at all. Next time (haha, next time) we would use the stuff you mix yourself, because he found the consistency too thick. The product says it takes 4 hours to dry which was not the case for us; we found it took at least a day and some areas needed more than one coat. But we did have some pretty substantial areas to patch. Once the patch dried, we went over the floors with a scraper to even out any remaining bits of adhesive or raised edges from the patch and made sure to clean it really well. Some of the areas were still raised after this step so we drilled floor screws in to try and flatten these spots.

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Close-up of our super damaged subfloor before scraping off excess adhesive and paper

IMG_4720Subfloor after scraping off adhesive and applying patch compound

Step 1C): Prime Surface

When the surface was as smooth as we could get it, we cleaned it really well and then primed the subfloor with special vinyl tile primer. They didn’t sell this at Home Depot and we were actually advised by someone there to just use paint primer (like what you would use for walls) on the floor to prime it before laying the tile. This didn’t sound right to my husband because the paint primer wouldn’t have had good adhesion to the patched spots, which is similar surface to cement; so we kept looking online until we found a multipurpose surface primer by TEC, which Lowe’s sold. Maybe it wouldn’t have mattered if the patched spots were minimal, but we had large sections that were patched.

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Action shot of my husband painting on primer

Step 2A): Apply Tiles

After the primer dried we were finally ready for the easy part- sticking on the tiles. This was pretty straightforward and there are lots of resources online to help with this. Basically you measure the room to find the midway point in either direction, then snap two chalk lines at these points that intersect at the centre of the floor. You put down the first tile at the centre point (without removing the backing) and do a dry run first so you can move the center tile towards either wall if necessary- like if it will make the last tile on either side of the room an awkward length. We ended up snapping an additional chalk line 12 inches off the centre line so that we could line up the offset tile for the next row as well (our tiles were 24×12 inches). Most people recommend laying the tile in sections, not in rows- this helps to keep everything lined up and squared nicely. Since the tiles were vinyl, we were able to use a heat gun and a utility knife to cut them when required. We pretty much worked outward from the centre in sections in a sort of stepwise fashion, and periodically ran over the surface with a floor roller to make sure they were really stuck on.

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Lining up the first tiles with the chalk lines

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Making sure the tiles are good and stuck with a floor roller

Step 2B): Grout Tiles (Optional)

Although you can place the tiles right next to each other without grout, we decided to use the grout because I thought that the slightly beveled edge would collect dirt if we didn’t, and also I wanted this to look as much like ceramic tile as possible. The grout was applied differently to grout you would use for ceramic tile; we used a piping bag and a grout float to get it in the cracks and wiped the excess off the tile immediately with a wet sponge so it didn’t dry.

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In Conclusion…

The end result does look pretty fabulous, but honestly it was so much more work than I had planned on, I am feeling a bit jaded about it. I should have been more realistic about how long it would take to get the old floors up and the surface prepared. This will vary from floor to floor, and it’s the kind of thing you can’t know until you start. Also, the kitchen is kind of an important room. Not having a kitchen for a few days is really inconvenient, especially if your kitchen is in the middle of the house and prevents you from going in the basement. We ended up eating a lot of take out and microwave meals while this was in progress, so if you don’t love Beefaroni like my husband does, you may want to reconsider the impact that not having an oven or stove will have on your diet.

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On the whole I would say in the future, flooring is something I would consider hiring out, and I’m not buying the perception that vinyl tile is so much easier to install than ceramic (coming from someone who has never installed ceramic…). This was also our very first flooring project, so on the flip side, maybe it was a good way to learn? It was definitely cheaper to go with vinyl tile over ceramic; we spent about $400 on the tile and the rest of the supplies, including renting a floor roller.

Do you have any stories to share of projects that seem so easy and then snowball into a horrible nightmare that won’t end? Can you assure me that the floors look awesome and this was totally worth doing? I’d love to answer any questions you have about this project!

-C

Bathroom Hopes and Dreams

Since we finalized our bathroom plans, lately we have been tackling the next hurdle: deciding on our fixtures. Our goal was to order the vanity, tub, and faucets by the end of January but we had a bit of a setback; when we got the quote prepared from the bathroom warehouse, the cost of the vanity we liked was quadruple what we were willing to pay. Yep, I said quadruple.

wet style frame collection vanity

Wetstyle vanity, Frame collection

Actually when we first saw it we weren’t 100% convinced, but the more we looked around the more we wanted it. It had an option for putting a cupboard on one side instead of the 2 drawers, and I liked the combination of the warmth from the wood with the coolness of the modern white. Plus it was the size we were looking for and had really great use of the storage space- a lot of the 48″ double vanities we’ve seen left hardly any room for toiletries due to the space allocated for the plumbing or poor layout design.

But we were not able to stomach the hefty price tag. So we went back to the drawing board to try and find a different vanity that would do the job but not completely break the budget, and settled on this one from IKEA.

IKEA godmorgon odensvik double sink

Godmorgon / Odensvik sink vanity with 4 drawers

Compared to the vanities we saw at Lowe’s, Home Depot, Bath Depot, and many others, the IKEA one actually has the best design and use of storage space, the lowest price tag, and highest build quality (solid wood drawers as opposed to MDF). We could even modify it to put a cupboard on one side with a piece of walnut to emulate the look of the too-rich-for-our-blood Wetstyle vanity.

We’re going to pair it with the Godmorgon tall cabinets and mirrored medicine cabinets for lots of storage space. I haven’t decided yet on lighting… we will probably do some recessed lights above the tub and shower, with sconce lights on either side of the vanity similar to this:

[from Houzz- click on photo for source]

[from Houzz- click on photo for source]

For the faucets, we decided on the Delta Trinsic collection in chrome. I don’t love the hand shower attachment for the tub but none of the collections we saw were completely perfect, and I’ll use that less than the vanity, shower, or tub faucets.
delta trinsic lavatory faucet delta trinsic roman tub faucet w hand shower delta trinsic shower head
As far as the tiling and general aesthetic of the bathroom goes, you may remember this photo that I shared in one of my previous posts- our tub and shower will be perpendicular to one another, with a glass partition separating the shower area from the rest of the bathroom, and a sloped floor for drainage.

[from Houzz- click on photo for source]

We will stick to something pretty similar for the flooring and accent tile, except in grey tones. We are leaning towards white subway tiles since they are relatively cheap and easy to keep clean, providing we use light grey grout like in this bathroom (who wants to spend their life scrubbing white grout with a toothbrush? Not this girl!).

[from Houzz- click on photo for source]

Whew! Now that the major decisions have been made, the only thing standing between us and starting this reno is installing our water softener to take some of the iron out of our water- no one wants a brand new white bathroom only to ruin it with rust stains.

Tell me what you think of our plans and if you have any other suggestions!

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